Scott

scott

15 years

ID#WB8887

Scott is a joy! Once you have met him, you will not forget his kindhearted, funny, and energetic personality. Loving and helpful, Scott thrives in the care of attentive, nurturing adults who interact with him with positive regard. Using encouragement, positive reinforcements, and rewards, and assuring that he has a very consistent daily routine will help him stay on track and do well behaviorally. As a sports fanatic, one of Scott’s favorite rewards for positive behavior is earning the sports jerseys or baseball caps of his favorite teams. Another favorite reward is having permission to ride one of the various bus routes within his community to people watch. Scott enjoys riding buses so much he has actually memorized all of his local routes. He also knows all of the connections to get to Seattle or Olympia. Scott would make an excellent bus dispatcher as an adult!

Scott loves being in the midst of things and is an enthusiastic participant in family, community, and school activities and outings. He especially loves outdoor activities. Scott has fun participating at the local Boys and Girls club and his youth group at church. To keep him busy this summer Scott’s foster father just signed him up for Adventures which is affiliated with the Boy Scouts, but is designed for older kids. He’s a long-time participant in the Special Olympics and also has lots of fun playing sports in the community. Basketball is his all-time favorite sport, but he enjoys soccer, flag football, bowling, and swimming. He even played volleyball for his middle school last year. Warning, only experts should challenge him to car races or a game of virtual basketball!

Scott has benefited from the stability of being in the same foster home for the last five years. Scott is currently placed with two other children in the home which is being parented by his single foster father. The foster father recognizes that Scott is not a kid who can just sit at home. His teachers, who ALL absolutely adore Scott, work especially well with him, too. The result is that Scott is doing really well on the home front and wants to go to school.

Scott has matured. He is now better able to manage disappointment when he’s not allowed to do something he really wants to do. Legally free, Scott came into foster care most recently in October 2008. Although Scott has a form of the genetic disorder called DiGeorge syndrome, he is one of the lucky ones whose symptoms are not as severe as others. Scott’s primary physician (who sees him every few months to monitor his medication therapy) and his cardiologist (who monitors him every nine months) are delighted that Scott is physically healthy with no current major medical needs. Some of the residual effects of the DGS do include learning difficulties and delays.

Despite his challenges Scott is able to stay active, talkative, and engaging with peers. His social and emotional development, though, is not at the maturity level of same-age peers and he can have difficulty understanding and responding as other kids his age do. Because changes and transitions continue to be stressful for Scott, those parenting and teaching him can relieve that stress by preparing him ahead of time for any disruptions and changes to his daily routine.

Scott’s social worker wants to hear from active, energetic families who will lovingly provide the structure he needs in his everyday life to help him do well and feel secure. Scott could be an only child or have a few siblings. During his adoption transition, his adoptive parents will have the opportunity to show Scott how supportive they are by allowing him the time he needs to make a successful transition into his new home. It may be important for Scott to continue to have contact with his current foster father. It will also be important for him to see that his adoptive parents also value the folks who have been such a wonderful stabilizing force for him. In the right home, Scott will thrive.

If you are interested in providing nurturing and love for Scott or for any other Special Needs Children, please call our office @ 419-726-5100 for further information.

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